Monday, 24 November 2014

POOLE POST - Dorset Community Media Project



WHY A MEDIA HUB FOR POOLE? 

Community media hubs can help build and highlight local businesses.
This is good for the town's commerce and growth. We can also reach people struck by isolation, loneliness and poverty. A healthy local economy can help support the community.


HELPING UNITE LOCAL PEOPLE

At the PoolePost.co.uk we aim to speak to neighbourhoods where living standards are high, low, or where rural, social or economic barriers prevent people accessing vital information and education.
We can promote the value of men and women, and investigate wrongs or serious abuses.


A POSTING PLATFORM FOR NEIGHBOURHOOD NEWS

We can introduce people to new ideas and help strengthen bonds within local communities.
Media can move mountains.
We help communities use it to change lives - and unite our town.


EXPANDING POOLE'S SOCIAL MEDIA OUTREACH

Bookmark our website and connect with us via social media at www.twitter.com/poolepost and www.facebook.com/poolepost to see how our local media hub is touching the lives of local people. 





Sunday, 22 June 2014

Press Gazette Prediction Proves Correct: Sorted Magazine Goes Down Under!




At the start of the year Press Gazette reported the remarkable circulation growth of Sorted magazine. Sorted is a men's lifestyle title published SCM Limited, a small British owned company based in Sussex. The feature contained a number of bold and ambitious announcements.

What grabbed the attention of the media industry was while other men's lifestyle brands were experiencing an overall readership slump, rivals like Nuts even facing closure, Sorted magazine was gaining subscriptions issue upon issue. This remains the trend, official ABC recorded statistics detailing Sorted's upward trajectory.

SCM's Director of Publishing, Duncan Williams, maintains; "the success of Sorted is due entirely to it's niche editorial and adherence to ethical content."

"We are the lad's mag with morals," smiles Williams. " A grown up, wholesome alternative to the tired old 'tissue mag' alternative that had once dominated the news shelves.

This policy has certainly won favour, particularly in the wake of the hacking scandal and a rapid change in public attitudes over acceptable standards of journalism.

Williams may well be smiling, as he himself was once a tabloid hack, earlier in his career working for the now notorious News of the World as an investigative freelancer.

"Although I was never personally involved in phone hacking," Williams is quick to point out, he does admit; "I was approached by Operation Weeting, and with some sober reflection, have to agree that techniques revealed as used by some journalists are clearly unacceptable. However, a large degree ofresponsibility must rest with the publishers and those at the top of media organisations. Journalists are frequently under huge pressure from directors and executives, people with power to shape editorial agendas, to find fresh exclusives. And a fish rots from the head down."

Following their success in the UK, Sorted announced in Press Gazette their plans to distribute down under in Australia before the close of the year. This has now happened and the current edition of Sorted magazine features a cover exclusive given by Russell Crowe, a man not usually shy with hostility when it comes to media hacks.

Crowe appears not only to have endorsed the Sorted brand but to be spearheading its launch in into the Antipodean market.

For a men's lifestyle title that heralds from Littlehampton in England, this is an impressive first step into another continent.

One that the international publishing community is sure to watch closely.

-----

Duncan Williams will be attending the Marketing Week Live conference at the Olympia Grand, London - 25th - 26th June, 2014. He will be available to answer any questions from advertisers and media buyers.

Wednesday, 2 April 2014

Nuts magazine to close: Have the lads' mags lost?

A report by Carey Lodge for ChristianToday.com


Nuts magazine has announced that it may soon be forced to close following a significant fall in sales.
A decline in the publishing industry, as well as specific campaigns against magazines carrying sexually explicit content, has meant a huge drop in readership for titles such as Nuts, Zoo and Front, which are primarily aimed at the men's market.
Pressure groups UK Feminista and Object launched a 'Lose the Lads' Mags' campaign back in May 2013, calling for supermarkets across Britain to stop selling magazines that they argue perpetuate the objectification of women.  And the campaign has only gone from strength to strength.
"Lads' mags promote sexist attitude and behaviours," the website reads.
"They normalise the idea that it's acceptable to treat women like sex objects. Yet despite widespread criticism over the years, high-street supermarkets and newsagents have continued to display and sell these degrading and harmful publications. But customers and shop employees don't have to put up with it any longer."



The Co-operative eventually pulled Zoo and Nuts from its shelves in September of last year after publishers refused to comply with regulations that required them to cover offending magazines up with opaque sleeves.
The latest news from Nuts comes as its publisher has announced a 30-day consultation with staff about a proposed closure.
"After ten years at the top of its market, we have taken the difficult decision to propose the closure of Nuts and exit the young men's lifestyle sector," Managing Director Paul Williams says.
According to The Guardian, Nuts weekly circulation in the latter half of 2013 was just 53,000 - a massive drop from 300,000 during its peak several years ago. The BBC reports that Nuts' readership has fallen by more than 70 per cent over the past eight years.
Lose the Lads Mags have celebrated this development, sending out a message to supporters that says: "For ten years Nuts has lined supermarket shelves with images portraying women as dehumanised sex objects. The research is all too clear on the consequences of this: attitudes that underpin violence against women."
Of the possible closure, they add: "It's big news. We thought you'd want to know."
Duncan Williams, Director of Publishing at Sorted – a wholesome monthly men's magazine that aims to "stimulate the mind rather than the libido" – has also expressed his delight. Bucking the trend of decline, Sorted has doubled its circulation in the past year to 40,000 subscribers.
"Sorted magazine continues to grow in circulation as rival titles in the men's lifestyle market decline or close altogether," he says.
"Underpinned with Christian ethics and filled with intelligent interviews and editorial, what was once thought to be a freak niche publication is now proving to be a popular mainstream front runner. As far as the publishing world is concerned, there is a new sheriff in town!"
Not everyone is quite so pleased, however. Many have noted that the closure of magazines like Nuts and Front does not signify a disinterest in their content, but rather that there is wider and cheaper access to more graphic pornography online. "Hardly a victory really, is it ladies?" writes Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett for The Guardian.



Thursday, 27 March 2014

Roger Moore Revisits Memories Of His Evacuee Childhood In Launceston, Cornwall

Report by Natalie Venning and Ruth Musson for Cornish and Devon Post



HIGH profile Launceston College alumni Bond-star Roger Moore and Duncan Williams, who attended the school some 40 years apart, will be brought together during a magazine interview.

Roger Moore, well-known as the longest serving actor who played the role of Bond from 1973 to 1985, is soon to be featured in Sorted, published by Son Christian Media Ltd, of which Mr Williams is director of publishing.

Mr Moore, born October 14, 1927, attended Battersea Grammar School before he was evacuated to Holsworthy during world war two. From there, he attended Launceston College and was then educated at Dr Challoner’s Grammar School, in Amersham, Buckinghamshire.

He made his film debut as an extra in 1945, appearing in small roles on stage and in films prior to his service in the army.

Mr Williams grew up in Launceston and owns land at Holsworthy. His grandfather was vicar at Werrington and later Wadebridge. Mr Williams will be interviewing Mr Moore along with professional biographer Frank Worrall, a St Ives-based author, who helped arrange the profile piece.

Sorted was established in 2007, after Steve Legg the now editor of the magazine wanted to provide ‘wholesome reading’, offering something different, ethical and faith-based. The magazine looks at success, sports, books, addictions, mentoring and a variety of other topics.

It has gradually grown as a magazine with the increase of professionalism and celebrity interviews to promote the rise of the readership.

Mr Legg’s wife Rebekah edits the sister title for women, Liberti.

The magazines are published six times a year, and in the last year have doubled their circulation to 40,000. They are distributed for free into UK prisons and the armed forces for chaplaincy material, as well as being sold across the UK and various countries as an alternative to ‘lad mags’.

Mr Williams said: “People have lost trust and faith in the media, we need to win back credibility, not with a law or government legalisation, but by appointing ethical editors and journalists to report news with integrity. These magazines are exactly the type of ethical brands that the post-Leveson and phone hacking weary public, might want to read.
“Celebrity without depth and shallow interviews, that reveal nothing, are boring readers who now want much more challenging content.

“The question of faith is no longer such a niche subject but one that many in the public eye are prepared to discuss. Even the question of lack of faith is an interesting basis to build an interview from.

“Recently the church has become more vocal on political issues, speaking out against poverty and often at the frontline with foodbanks and offering meeting facilities for addiction recovery groups.

“If the media would keep highlighting these issues and have the courage to report them in favour of trivia, we would really be seeing progressive changes in society.”

Each edition of the magazine features an interview with a celebrity, with questions focused on faith.

Mr Moore’s interview is scheduled to be published in a summer edition, and he hopes to evoke memories of his time at Launceston.

Saturday, 22 February 2014

Tory floods soundbite rebounds on Cameron

Report by Dave Sewell

Floods in Somerset (Pic: Guy Smallman)

Fierce storms with winds of over 100 miles an hour killed three people last week and left around one million without power.

Britain’s soil was already saturated with water from the wettest winter in centuries. The additional rain was enough to keep large parts of the Thames Valley, the Somerset Levels and other regions flooded.
David Cameron tried to put an end to embarrassing in-fighting by pledging that “money is no object” in the government’s response to floods.

In admitting that Britain is a “rich country” Cameron exposed the lies that he and all the main political parties have used to justify years of austerity.

But unfortunately his promise to splash the cash evaporated within 24 hours.

Tory transport secretary Patrick McLoughlin clarified that, “I don’t think it’s a blank cheque”.
Then Downing Street said any money would have to come out of existing budgets—no new funding was being made available.

Loans

So, the £31 million to rebuild rail lines in south west England was already promised last year.
And up to £750 million of the “help” for flood victims will take the form of loans from RBS, Lloyds, Barclays, HSBC, Santander and Nationwide.

Residents of flood-hit areas were furious. “All these politicians who’ve been going round welly-clad to spout their opinions, it’s all just talk,” said Duncan Williams (pictured left) from Chertsey, Surrey.

The reality is that the Tories slashed funding for food defences by almost £100 million a year.

Hundreds of projects that were planned after the Pitt review that followed the 2007 floods were cancelled.

These include ones that would have protected Burrowbridge in Somerset and Yalding in Kent where Cameron was keen to be photographed.

New Tory guidelines meant that flood defence projects had to guarantee they would prevent an average £8 of damage for every £1 they cost to build.

The figure was previously £5.

That effectively ruled out the river-dredging on the Somerset Levels that the Tories are now keen to champion.


It means that many homes are seen as not worth saving.

Cameron (pictured right) claimed that more has been spent on floods under the current four year period than in the previous four years. This sleight of hand only works if non-government funding is counted.

And he has refused to rule out planned job cuts at the Environment Agency.

Parliament’s committee for climate change warned that £500 million more is needed to make up the shortfall.
The real cost could be much higher.

It’s still a tiny fraction of what is wasted on bankers’ bonuses or Trident nuclear weapons.

But these are the Tories’ priorities, not the environment.

---------------------------------------------------------------

Article first published in Socialist Worker - 22nd Feb, 2014 --

Friday, 14 February 2014

Duncan Williams (newspaper executive) - Wikipedia

Duncan Williams is a British publisher involved in regional news and sport media. He bought a portfolio of hyper-local newspapers during a period of industry transition[1], where long established titles were closing down and often selling at rock bottom prices.[2] As rapid readership migrations from print to digital took hold, Williams maintained that "the real value investment is in the brand". He is also known for his work within the faith publishing sector[3], where he was involved in the surprise post-Leveson success of a Christian themed magazine[4] named Sorted gaining a foothold within the mainstream and highly competitive lads' mag marketplace.[5]

References[edit source | edit]

Friday, 24 January 2014

Sorted magazine : a revolution in media

A report by Carey Lodge of ChristainToday.com



Despite a decline in the publishing industry and a huge drop in sales for lads' mags, Sorted magazine – aimed primarily at Christian men - is celebrating, having doubled its circulation in the past year from 20,000 to 40,000.

Editor Steve Legg first came up with the idea of creating a wholesome magazine for men after chatting with another dad at the school gates and discovering that young boys were bringing inappropriate material into school.

He saw a gap in the market for a magazine that "stimulate[s] the mind rather than the libido" and set about creating something "more mature, upbeat and wholesome" for the men's market.

The end result was Sorted, which comes out six times a year and is sold in newsagents such as WH Smiths, as well as being made available in bars, gyms, clubs, prisons and waiting areas across the UK. Published by Son Christian Media Ltd, it is also currently sold in 15 other countries globally.

Steve, a professional evangelist who often uses escapologist displays to communicate the gospel, says: "It's something for men to identify with in a positive way."

The magazine has proved a hit among those who don't wish to be patronised by the usual offerings aimed at their demographic, which are currently facing pressure from campaigns such as 'No more Page 3' and 'Lose the Lads' Mags'.

Though the magazine has a Christian basis, it also hopes to reach men from all faiths and walks of life, or indeed no faith at all.

Director of publishing Duncan Williams notes that the majority of subscribers are not, in fact, Christians. "We have a huge number of subscribers in the Armed Forces and the Royal Navy distribute the magazine in all their mess halls," he explains.


"Having spoke to chaplaincies, while troops are away they can become very isolated and have no Christian reading material beyond the Bible. Sorted is accessible and real to them. With film reviews and things like that, it lets them know what's going on in the secular world."

Each edition features a detailed interview with a male celebrity. Past starts include Will Smith, Steve Carrell, Denzel Washington and Michael Caine. It also runs articles about finance, sport, faith, addictions, fitness, mentoring, gadgets and more, not to mention a '60 Second life Coach' and a 'Sex Doc'.

TV presenter and professional adventurer Bear Grylls, known for his strong faith and endorsement of the Alpha course, also regularly contributes to the magazine. He has labelled it as "down to earth, real [and] un-religious", and says it has "helped my Christian faith so much".

There is obviously a market for this different kind of men's magazine, revealed by Sorted's growing circulation and subscription rate.

Of the new increase in readership, Williams says: "Sorted has been an encouraging success, as has our lifestyle title for women, Liberti magazine.

"The popularity of these two titles has been a real sign that there is a growing readership, male and female and of various ages, that appreciates contemporary Christian publications.
"I think demand has risen following the hacking scandal to have genuinely positive, trustworthy and ethical reporting, and Christian media provides that.

"We ask fundamental questions – we ask about faith or lack of it, which gives an interesting angle rather than tapping around celebrity gossip. When David Frost asked Tony Blair 'Do you pray?' it completely flummoxed him. By asking that question to celebrities you get some interesting reactions, and it's been really rewarding to find a different angle to the usual salacious gossip offered by the tabloids."

The next edition of Sorted featuring Ben Stiller will be published on 18 February.




Wednesday, 15 January 2014

'Wholesome' men's mag with a Christian slant bucks the trend of circulation decline



Report for Press Gazette by Emma McGarthy

The circulation of men's magazines such as Loaded, Nuts and Zoo have been in freefall in recent years - but a title with more "wholesome" content claims to be bucking the trend.

Sorted, a men's title with a Christian slant, comes out six times a year and has doubled its circulation over the last year from 20,000 to 40,000.

Launched in 2007, it has a newsstand sale of 2,000 and 3,300 subscribers with the remainder circulated via bulk distribution deals to outlets including bars, gyms and health clubs. Business backers pay for the title to be distributed for free into UK prisons and to the armed forces.

The title covers usual men's mag fare of science, football and movies - but also deals with "faith". Publisher and editor Steve Legg says he was inspired to launch Sorted after talking to a dad: “He was telling me how his 11-year-old son's mates were bringing in lads mags and he was complaining at the lack of something more positive and wholesome in the marketplace.”

Director of publishing Duncan Williams said Sorted is a more mature, upbeat and wholesome magazine than other men's titles, with more in-depth content.

He says: “It’s something for men to identify with in a positive way...A lot people buying it are women as presents [for men] as it’s not derogative.”

Each publication features an in-depth interview with a male celebrity. He said that big names who have spoken to the title include Will Smith, Steve Carrell, Denzil Washington, Anthony Hopkins and Michael Caine. Williams says: “We try to ask in-depth questions that aren’t the usual PR fair…which produce interesting interviews. Asking that key question about faith is rewarding.”

The magazine is next published on 18 February priced £4.

It has a full-time staff of three, with six freelances, and revenue comes from a mix of subscribers and advertisers such as Apple and David Beckham’s deodorant brand. Regular editorial contributors include TV adventurer Bear Grylls.

Williams said: “Advertisers are very keen to be associated with a more wholesome and mature publication.”

There are plans to expand the title into New Zealand and Australia.



Monday, 6 January 2014

At the forefront of UK faith news publishing

Son Christian Media Ltd is Britain’s leading mainstream faith publisher.

In addition to our social media platform THE SON , we publish print titles called SORTED magazine and Liberti magazine, which are distributed nationally via WHSmith and all good newsagents and in 15 other countries globally. Sorted magazine, which is aimed primarily at Christian men, has doubled its circulation in the past year from 20,000 to 40,000.

Created by editor Steve Legg and publisher Duncan Williams after seeing a gap in the market for a magazine that “stimulate[s] the mind rather than the libido” and set about creating something “more mature, upbeat and wholesome” for the men’s market.

Steve says: “It’s something for men to identify with in a positive way. We have a huge number of subscribers in the Armed Forces and the Royal Navy distribute the magazine in all their mess halls. Having spoke to chaplaincies, while troops are away they can become very isolated and have no Christian reading material beyond the Bible. Sorted is accessible and real to them. With film reviews and things like that, it lets them know what’s going on in the secular world.”

The content regularly includes celebrity interviews, past stars have included Will Smith, Steve Carrell, Denzel Washington and Michael Caine. As well as finance, sport, faith, fitness, mentoring, gadgets and more.

Duncan Williams says: “Sorted has been an encouraging success, as has our lifestyle title for women, Liberti magazine. The popularity of these two titles has been a real sign that there is a growing readership, male and female and of various ages, that appreciates contemporary Christian publications. I think demand has risen following the hacking scandal to have genuinely positive, trustworthy and ethical reporting, and Christian media provides that.

“We ask fundamental questions – we ask about faith or lack of it, which gives an interesting angle rather than tapping around celebrity gossip. When David Frost asked Tony Blair ‘Do you pray?’ it completely flummoxed him. By asking that question to celebrities you get some interesting reactions, and it’s been really rewarding to find a different angle to the usual salacious gossip offered by the tabloids.”



For more details visit: WWW.THE-SON.CO.UK

WWW.SORTED-MAGAZINE.COM

WWW.LIBERTIMAGAZINE.COM